Best Food for Puppies

Best Food for Puppies
Is your puppy scratching, biting or licking his ear everyday? If so, your puppy may suffer from the painful allergy known as atopy. Atopy is a skin allergy that can develop in dogs. An atopy dog may have irritated skin, possibly due to allergies such as canine atopy, which is an allergy to pollen, dust mites and household spores. Another type of allergy in atopy is known as food allergy. This can develop after the puppy consumed a food that its system didn't like. Dogs are known to have allergy to foods such as wheat and corn. If you want to lower your puppy's risk of developing this allergy, ensure that you don't give him the following: sweets, bread, chocolate, eggs, pork and Soya. Atopy can be the result of the dog's immune system reactingant glands, meaning the dog's skin area. These gland can be affected by the dog's inflamed skin. This usually comes after the puppy has been playing to hard with his brothers and sisters, causing them to scratch and bite as a result. The dog's system will start to ThShop the histamine and onto the effect of the food he just ingested. swell and swelling will appear in the affected area. Veterinarians call this type of skin allergy as acute superficial pyoderma. Other possible causes of atopy are: bacterial skin infections, allergies, deficiencies of nutrients and minerals, too much sun/heat and ground boots can be a possible cause. However, once you have considered all of these possibilities and found nothing to turn your dog's skin into a culprit, it might be time to move on to a more serious cause: a skin allergy. When dealing with a food allergy, the very first thing to look for is the ingredient that you have unwittingly feeding your dog. If you currently give your dog a commercial diet, it may start a food allergy that will manifest in atopy some time in the future. When a skin allergy appears, we suggest you buy back your dog's food to its original formulation. This will ensure that the likelihood of developing a future dog food allergy is very low. Your best bet is to feed your dog a brand of food that doesn't contain a known allergen. Many owners who have switched their dogs to a grain free diet, have noticed an almost immediate improvement in their dog's itchy skin. If you don't want to switch their dog's diet to a grain free food regimen, you can cut the top off of the grain Introduction by applying a 10% hydrogen peroxide solution and then bathing the dog in this concentrated solution. This will disinfect the inflamed area and reduce the likelihood of spreading the dog's infection further. Two other types of skin allergy that are common in dogs include flea allergy dermatitis and canine atopy. These allergies are most commonly caused when a dog is exposed to fleas. Flea allergy dermatitis is caused by flea bites and normally appears as red, circular plaques formed by inflamed skin. Canine atopy is caused by inhaling dust, mites, and other irritants. Symptoms of this allergy include red moist dermatitis on the feet, legs and abdomen. In order to diagnose a canine skin allergy, you will need to examine your dog's skin. If you suspect fleas or mites, you may wish to try an anti-flea/tick spray to treat your dog. If your dog inhales or comes into contact with allergens, the most likely source of the problem is the dog's hair coat. Regularly brushing your dog's hair and maintaining it in a good condition will greatly minimize the presence of fleas and mites. A dog that spends a great deal of time outside should be examined for insects and pest excrements on a regular basis. The treatments above can be used alone or in conjunction with other treatments prescribed by your veterinarian.